OI Research Update: Longitudinal Study

Join the OIF for a discussion about the Longitudinal Study of Osteogenesis Imperfecta on Thursday, September 22 at 7:00 PM ET

The Longitudinal Study of Osteogenesis Imperfecta, also known as the Natural History Study, is the largest research project ever conducted on people with OI.  With nearly 1000 people enrolled, it has tracked the life cycle of symptoms for people with OI since 2009.  Findings from this Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium (BBDC) study will help medical professionals better understand OI’s impact on individuals at different stages of life and will be used as a foundation for developing guidelines for care.

To help explain this study and answer audience questions, the OIF will be joined by Dr. Reid Sutton, Geneticist at Baylor College of Medicine, Administrative Director and Principal Investigator of the BBDC, and member of the OIF Medical Advisory Council and Board of Directors. Dr. Sutton will discuss the design of the study, its goals, and what researchers have learned so far.

 

CLICK HERE TO REGISTER TO ATTEND

 

This session is part of a series meant to demystify and contextualize medical research from the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium. Previous research updates can be viewed here.

 

COVID-19 Survey 3 Results

Thank you to all of the 577 OI community members who took the time to fill out the OI Foundation’s third COVID-19 survey! Our goal in gathering the community’s input is to provide feedback during the changing landscape of COVID-19 and direct the OIF’s resources where most needed. CLICK HERE to view the full survey results and important findings.

 

To complete future surveys about OI, we highly encourage you to sign up for the OI Registry at www.oif.org/OIregistry to be the first to hear about these opportunities.

OI Research Update: New Medical Treatments

On March 15, 2022, the OI Foundation spoke with Dr. Brendan Lee, Principal Investigator for the Brittle Bone Disease Consortium (BBDC). In this interview, they discussed new drugs being studied to treat osteogenesis imperfecta, and the drug development process. Watch the session recording below, or click here to view the recording on YouTube.

 

This session is the fifth in a series meant to demystify and contextualize medical research from the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium (BBDC). The BBDC is a multicenter initiative that focuses on understanding and providing better treatment options for osteogenesis imperfecta. The previous BBDC research updates can be viewed here

As a partner of the OIF, the BBDC has 3 major goals:

  1. Gain a better understanding of all genetic forms of OI
  2. Expand treatment options for those with OI
  3. Help guide the next generation of physicians and scientists.

This series is intended for anyone who wants to learn more about OI medical research. We hope you will attend a future session!


New study results on drug treatment for OI published in Journal of Clinical Investigation

The study, “Targeting transforming growth factor- β (TGF-β) for treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta” was led by OIF MAC Member Dr. Brendan Lee of Baylor College of Medicine. Click here to learn more about this study.

Research Announcement: ORBIT Study

The OI Foundation would like to bring your attention to a research study being conducted by Ultragenyx Pharmaceutical Inc:

The Ultragenyx Orbit clinical study is for individuals living with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy and safety of setrusumab in pediatric and young adult patients with OI Types I, III, or IV.  Setrusumab is a monoclonal antibody being developed for the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Study participants are at least 5 but not yet 26 years of age, have a confirmed diagnosis of OI Types I, III, or IV, had at least one fracture in the past year or at least two fractures in the past 2 years, and are willing to not receive bisphosphonate therapy during the study. For more information, please click here, or reach out to trialrecruitment@ultragenyx.com.

 

If you are interested in learning more about this trial and to see if you can participate you can reach out to trialrecruitment@ultragenyx.org.


 

Move OI Research Forward – Participate in OI Studies

Move OI Research Forward – Participate in OI Studies

A clinical study is research that involves human volunteers and seeks to answer questions that will add to our knowledge about a medical condition or how to treat it. Learn more about types of studies, how they are organized, and what to consider before participating by reviewing the OIF’s What You Need To Know About Clinical Trials factsheet.

All current OI Studies are listed on the OIF’s Current Studies webpage at www.oif.org/currentstudies.


The OI Foundation would like to bring your attention to current OI research studies:

ORBIT Study

The Ultragenyx ORBIT study is investigating a new treatment in pediatric and young adults with OI Types I, III, or IV. You can find more information on the study flyer here.

If you are interested in learning more about this trial or would like to see if you are able to participate, please reach out to Erin at trialrecruitment@ultragenyx.com


 

OI Wellbeing Study

OI Community Members Ages 13-17: Participate in the OI Wellbeing Study!
In partnership with the OIF, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine are conducting a study to better understand the mental health and pain experiences of the OI community. You will have the opportunity to share your individual experiences and discuss what you think could be improved for people living with OI. Your feedback will inform future research in this area.

Taking part in the study includes participating in an approximately one-hour online interview and the completion of a questionnaire, for which you will be compensated $50. This study is for US residents only. If you or your child are interested in participating in the study, please contact the study team at OIWellbeing@bcm.edu for more information.


Use of clear aligners for the treatment of dental malocclusion in individuals with Osteogenesis Imperfecta Types III and IV

The purpose of this study is to determine if it is safe to use Invisalign clear aligners in correcting the misalignment of teeth in people with OI. Clear aligners are transparent plastic trays that are designed to fit over your teeth. With each new tray, teeth are moved a little at a time until they reach the desired position.

For more information, or to see if you are eligible to participate, please contact: Dianne Nguyen, BBDC Project Manager at (713)798-6694 or diannen@bcm.edu


Longitudinal Study of Osteogenesis Imperfecta

The Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium is currently recruiting for a Longitudinal Study of Osteogenesis Imperfecta. The purpose of this natural history study is to perform a long-term follow-up of a large group of people with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). We will collect information including medical history, number of broken bones, surgeries done, medications taken, ability to walk, pain, lung function and breathing, hearing, and bone mineral density.

The overall goal is to improve the health and quality of life of people with OI. Click here to learn more about this study.


Join the OI Registry! The easiest way to learn more about current and upcoming clinical studies is to enroll in the OI Registry. Once you enter your information into this registry, the OIF or researchers will have access to your deidentified information and may ask you to participate in OI surveys or studies. Click here to join now.

 

OIF Research Update: Mental Health and OI

Thursday, November 18, 2021   |   6:00 PM

During this session, Dr. Reid Sutton (Geneticist at Baylor College of Medicine and OIF Medical Advisory Council member) and Dr. Eric Storch (Vice-Chair and Head of Psychology at Baylor College of Medicine) share their experience working with the OI community, outline the new study the BBDC is undertaking around mental health, and explain what they hope to learn. Click here to watch the recording of this session.

This session is the fourth in a series meant to demystify and contextualize medical research from the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium (BBDC). The BBDC is a multicenter initiative that focuses on understanding and providing better treatment options for osteogenesis imperfecta. The previous BBDC research updates can be viewed here

As a partner of the OIF, the BBDC has 3 major goals:

  1. Gain a better understanding of all genetic forms of OI
  2. Expand treatment options for those with OI
  3. Help guide the next generation of physicians and scientists.

This series is intended for anyone who wants to learn more about OI medical research. We hope you will attend a future session!

Consortium Spotlight: BBDC

This month, the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium was featured as the Consortium Spotlight by the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network.

The Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium is part of the National Institutes of Health Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network. It is a multi-center program that focuses on understanding and providing better treatment options for all types of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

Consortium Spotlight: Advancing Discoveries in Brittle Bone Disorders:

The Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium (BBDC) brings together physicians, researchers, and educators to learn more about osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), a genetic disorder that mainly affects the development of the bones. The goal is to develop new and better treatments for patients with OI. Here, principal investigator Brendan Lee, MD, PhD, and Vernon Sutton, MD, share the history of the consortium, current research, and future plans.
Click here to read more.


Early-Stage Investigator Spotlight: Chaya Nautiyal Murali Gets Creative with Osteogenesis Imperfecta Research:

Chaya Nautiyal Murali, MD, is a pediatric geneticist at Baylor College of Medicine and a member of the Brittle Bone Disorders Consortium (BBDC). She is also an accomplished essayist, using her creative writing skills to highlight themes of identity, inheritance, and family through the lenses of immigration and genetics. Here, she shares her start in rare disease research, exciting discoveries, and future goals.
Click here to read more.


Patient Spotlight: Fynan Family Fueled by OI Research

Michelle Fynan, PhD, LMHC, is a mother of two daughters, age seven and four. She and her daughters are diagnosed with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I, the mildest form of OI, which is characterized by bone fractures that often result from minor trauma. Here, Michelle shares her journey with OI, from adolescent struggles to finding her purpose as an OI activist and researcher.
Click here to read more.


Patient Advocate Spotlight: Tracy Hart Fosters Connections to Help Patients with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

Tracy Hart, chief executive officer of the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation, serves as chair of the RDCRN’s Coalition of Patient Advocacy Groups.
Click here to read more.

 


 

Meet OIF Michael Geisman Fellow: Dr. Francesca Tonelli

Meet Dr. Francesca Tonelli, OIF Michael Geisman Fellow

By: Gabriela Beug, OIF Science and Media Communications Intern

As osteogenesis imperfecta is a rare bone disease, research grants remain difficult to acquire worldwide. The Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation makes research a priority through the Michael Geisman Fellowship program (created in memory of Michael Geisman, son of OI Foundation founder Gemma Geisman), which funds post-doctoral trainees whose research aims to predict, prevent, diagnose, and treat osteogenesis imperfecta (OI).

With the support of the Michael Geisman Fellowship program, awardees work to develop new approaches for therapies targeting OI. In the developmental stages, therapies are first tested on animal models (i.e. mice, zebrafish) before passing the requirements to move on to clinical trials. Studying diseases requires organisms with the same morphological and biochemical properties as well as a similar genome to humans. Both mice and zebrafish have a high level of genetic conservation – meaning a large part of their genome is identical to humans. While in zebrafish this number is around 70%, in mice it averages around 85%.  Mice and zebrafish offer an alternative to relying on human samples to test hypotheses, especially for rare bone disease where access to samples is limited.


The OI Foundation is proud to support Dr. Francesca Tonelli of University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy.

“I believe it is a unique experience to study a rare disease and I wish every scientist could have this opportunity at some point in their career. Even if I enjoy the individual aspects of lab work like creating animal models, the research in the OI field makes me feel like I will support other people and it is personally very rewarding. It’s the interaction with an individual with OI  and  the hope of finding a cure for them that make me passionate and persistent in testing new hypotheses until we can develop a cure.” Dr. Francesca Tonelli

Francesca Tonelli obtained her bachelor’s degree in medical and pharmaceutical biotechnology from the University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy in 2012 and continued in the same field, completing her master’s degree in 2014. Her journey with osteogenesis imperfecta began by characterizing the dominant OI zebrafish model Chihuahua, which at the time was a new model for studying osteogenesis imperfecta. During her PhD she generated several new recessive OI zebrafish models by CRISPR Cas9 gene editing technique. In 2017, Tonelli received her Ph.D. in biomedical sciences under Dr. Antonella Forlino’s supervision. Continuing under her mentorship for her postdoctoral training, she is now applying her training to research in osteogenesis imperfecta. In her free time, Dr. Tonelli likes to read, kickbox, or scuba dive.

Areas of Expertise

  • Crispr-Cas9 gene editing
  • Designing, cloning, transcribing CRISPR constructs
  • Generating zebrafish models to investigate skeletal diseases
  • Drug screening: 4-PBA

It is well established that cellular stress is one of the main factors contributing to the osteogenesis imperfecta disease, which disrupts the homeostasis (the “well-being” of cells), leading to protein misfolding. The novel finding of Dr. Tonelli led to identifying chemical compounds such as 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), a drug approved for urea cycle disorders whose beneficial chaperone activity also aids in ameliorating the bone phenotype of OI in the dominant and the recessive zebrafish model.

Her research now focuses on the study of bone formation, thanks to the zebrafish’s ability to regenerate the caudal fin. Caudal fin regeneration essentially mimics the dermal bone formation process similarly as it would occur during the human bone growth. Caudal fin regeneration can be exploited also to test the effect of new potential drugs.

Although 4-PBA has been identified as a potential therapeutic target, steps remain to transition from the lab to the translation in patients. Dr. Tonelli’s next step is to test a chemically modified version of 4-PBA, which would increase drug stability, specifically targeting bone tissue, making it more friendly for clinical trials in the future.

Selected Publications:

  • Zebrafish: A Resourceful Vertebrate Model to Investigate Skeletal Disorders. Tonelli F, Bek JW, Besio R, De Clercq A, Leoni L, Salmon P, Coucke PJ, Willaert A, Forlino A. Front Endocrinol 2020 doi: 10.3389/fendo.2020.00489
  • Novel RPL13 variants and variable clinical expressivity in a human ribosomopathy with spondyloepimetaphyseal dysplasia. Costantini A, Alm JJ, Tonelli F, Valta H, Huber C, Tran AN, Daponte V, Kirova N, Kwon YU, Bae JY, Chung WY, Tan S, Sznajer Y, Nishimura G, Näreoja T, Warren AJ, Cormier-Daire V, Kim OH, Forlino A, Cho TJ, Mäkitie O. J Bone Miner Res 2020 doi: 10.1002/jbmr.4177
  • Crtap and p3h1 knock out zebrafish support defective collagen chaperoning as the cause of their osteogenesis imperfecta phenotype. Tonelli F, Cotti S, Leoni L, Besio R, Gioia R, Marchese L, Giorgetti S, Gistelinck C, Wagener R, Kobbe B, Larionova D, Fiedler I.A.K., Busse B, Eyre D, Rossi A, Witten PE, Forlino A. Matrix Biology 2020, (90): 40-60. doi: 10.1016/j.matbio.2020.03.004
  • Bone biology: insights from osteogenesis imperfecta and related rare fragility syndromes.
    Besio R, Chow CW, Tonelli F, Marini JC, Forlino A. FEBS J. 2019, (15):3033-3056. doi: 10.1111/febs.14963.
  • Steady-State and Pulse-Chase Analyses of Fibrillar Collagen. Forlino A, Tonelli F, Besio R. Methods Mol Biol. 2019;(1952):45-53. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-9133-4_4.
  • Zebrafish Collagen Type I: Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the Major Structural Protein in Bone and Skin.Gistelinck C, Gioia R, Gagliardi A, Tonelli F, Marchese L, Bianchi L, Landi C, Bini L, Huysseune A, Witten PE, Staes A, Gevaert K, De Rocker N, Menten B, Malfait F, Leikin S, Carra S, Tenni R, Rossi A, De Paepe A, Coucke P, Willaert A, Forlino A. Sci Rep. 2016, (6):21540.
  • The chaperone activity of 4PBA ameliorates the skeletal phenotype of Chihuahua, a zebrafish model for dominant osteogenesis imperfecta. Gioia R.*, Tonelli F.*, Ceppi I., Biggiogera M., Leikin S., Fisher S., Tenedini E., Yorgan T.A., Schinke T., Tian K., Schwartz J.M., Forte F., Wagener R., Villani S., Rossi A. and Forlino A. Hum Mol Genet 2017, (26):2897-2911. * first co-authors

OI Wellbeing Study – Now Recruiting

Are you or your child living with OI? Are you a caregiver or clinician who cares for someone with OI?

In partnership with the OIF, researchers at Baylor College of Medicine are conducting a study to better understand the mental health and pain experiences of the OI community. You will have the opportunity to share your individual experiences and discuss what you think could be improved for people living with OI. Your feedback will inform future research in this area.

For this first phase of the study, the study team aims to recruit 50 families, though larger studies will follow. Taking part in the study includes participating in an approximately one-hour online interview and the completion of a questionnaire, for which you will be compensated $50.

If you or your child are interested in participating in the study, please fill out the survey at the following link: https://bit.ly/OIWellbeing

For any other inquiries about the study, please contact the study team at OIWellbeing@bcm.edu or (713) 798-8563 for more information.

BCM IRB Approval: H-49741